Jeep Wrangler (2018 year). Instruction - part 23

 

  Index      Jeep     Jeep Wrangler - instruction 2018 year in english

 

Search            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  21  22  23  24   ..

 

 

Jeep Wrangler (2018 year). Instruction - part 23

 

 

Off-Road Driving Tips

Side Step Removal — If Equipped

NOTE:

Prior to off-road usage, the side steps should be

removed to prevent damage if so equipped.
1. There are two studs on the bodyside of each connecting

bracket.

2. Remove both nuts from the underside of the vehicle for

each bracket.

3. Remove the side step assembly.

Bodyside Studs

Underside Nuts

358

STARTING AND OPERATING

Bumper End Cap Removal

The end caps on your vehicle’s front bumper can be

removed by following the steps below:
1. Loosen the two bolts that retain the GAWR bracket

(Bolts #1 and #2) to the end cap using a T45 torx bit

screw driver. Do not remove the bolts.

2. Remove the remaining 8 bolts. The end cap can now be

expanded open.

3. Gently remove the end cap from the vehicle and store it

where it will not get damaged.

4. Repeat this procedure on the other side.

Bolt #1

Bolt #2

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

359

The Basics Of Off-Road Driving

You will encounter many types of terrain driving off-road.

You should be familiar with the terrain and area before

proceeding. There are many types of surface conditions:

hard-packed dirt, gravel, rocks, grass, sand, mud, snow

and ice. Every surface has a different effect on your

vehicle’s steering, handling and traction. Controlling your

vehicle is one of the keys to successful off-road driving, so

always keep a firm grip on the steering wheel and maintain

a good driving posture. Avoid sudden accelerations, turns

or braking. In most cases, there are no road signs, posted

speed limits or signal lights. Therefore, you will need to use

your own good judgment on what is safe and what is not.

When on a trail, you should always be looking ahead for

surface obstacles and changes in terrain. The key is to plan

your future driving route while remembering what you are

currently driving over.

NOTE:

It is recommended that the Start/Stop System be

disabled during off-road use.

CAUTION!

Never park your vehicle over dry grass or other com-
bustible materials. The heat from your vehicle exhaust
system could cause a fire.

WARNING!

Always wear your seat belt and firmly tie down cargo.
Unsecured cargo can become projectiles in an off-road
situation.

When To Use 4L (Low) Range

When off-road driving, shift into 4L (Low) for additional

traction and control on slippery or difficult terrain, ascend-

ing or descending steep hills, and to increase low speed

pulling power. This range should be limited to extreme

situations such as deep snow, mud, steep inclines, or sand

where additional low speed pulling power is needed.

Vehicle speeds in excess of 25 mph (40 km/h) should be

avoided when in 4L (Low) range.

360

STARTING AND OPERATING

CAUTION!

Do not use 4L (Low) range when operating the vehicle
on dry pavement. Driveline hardware damage can
result.

Simultaneous Brake And Throttle Operation

Many off-road driving conditions require the simultaneous

use of the brake and throttle (two-footed driving). When

climbing rocks, logs, or other stepped objects, using light

brake pressure with light throttle will keep the vehicle from

jerking or lurching. This technique is also used when you

need to stop and restart a vehicle on a steep incline.

Driving In Snow, Mud And Sand

Snow

In heavy snow or for additional control and traction at

slower speeds, shift the transmission into a low gear and

the transfer case into 4L (Low) if necessary. Do not shift to

a lower gear than necessary to maintain headway. Over-

revving the engine can spin the wheels and traction will be

lost. If you start to slow to a stop, try turning your steering

wheel no more than a 1/4 turn quickly back and forth,

while still applying throttle. This will allow the tires to get

a fresh

⬙bite⬙ and help maintain your momentum.

CAUTION!

On icy or slippery roads, do not downshift at high
engine RPM or vehicle speeds, because engine braking
may cause skidding and loss of control.

Mud

Deep mud creates a great deal of suction around the tires

and is very difficult to get through. You should use second

gear (manual transmission), or DRIVE (automatic trans-

mission), with the transfer case in the 4L (Low) position to

maintain your momentum. If you start to slow to a stop, try

turning your steering wheel no more than a 1/4 turn

quickly back and forth for additional traction. Mud holes

pose an increased threat of vehicle damage and getting

stuck. They are normally full of debris from previous

vehicles getting stuck. As a good practice before entering

any mud hole, get out and determine how deep it is, if

there are any hidden obstacles and if the vehicle can be

safely recovered if stuck.

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

361

Sand

Soft sand is very difficult to travel through with full tire

pressure. When crossing soft, sandy spots in a trail, main-

tain your vehicle’s momentum and do not stop. The key to

driving in soft sand is using the appropriate tire pressure,

accelerating slowly, avoiding abrupt maneuvers and main-

taining the vehicle’s momentum. If you are going to be

driving on large soft sandy areas or dunes, reduce your tire

pressure to a minimum of 15 psi (103 kPa) to allow for a

greater tire surface area. Reduced tire pressure will drasti-

cally improve your traction and handling while driving on

the soft sand, but you must return the tires to normal air

pressure before driving on pavement or other hard sur-

faces. Be sure you have a way to reinflate the tires prior to

reducing the pressure.

CAUTION!

Reduced tire pressures may cause tire unseating and
total loss of air pressure. To reduce the risk of tire
unseating, while at a reduced tire pressure, reduce your
speed and avoid sharp turns or abrupt maneuvers.

Crossing Obstacles (Rocks And Other High Points)

While driving off-road, you will encounter many types of

terrain. These varying types of terrain bring different types

of obstacles. Before proceeding, review the path ahead to

determine the correct approach and your ability to safely

recover the vehicle if something goes wrong. Keeping a

firm grip on the steering wheel, bring the vehicle to a

complete stop and then inch the vehicle forward until it

makes contact with the object. Apply the throttle lightly

while holding a light brake pressure and ease the vehicle

up and over the object.

WARNING!

Crossing obstacles can cause abrupt steering system
loading which could cause you to loose control of your
vehicle.

362

STARTING AND OPERATING

Using A Spotter

There are many times where it is hard to see the obstacle or

determine the correct path. Determining the correct path

can be extremely difficult when you are confronting many

obstacles. In these cases have someone guide you over,

through, or around the obstacle. Have the person stand a

safe distance in front of you where they can see the

obstacle, watch your tires and undercarriage, and guide

you through.

Crossing Large Rocks

When approaching large rocks, choose a path which en-

sures you drive over the largest of them with your tires.

This will lift your undercarriage over the obstacle. The

tread of the tire is tougher and thicker than the side wall

and is designed to take the abuse. Always look ahead and

make every effort to cross the large rocks with your tires.

CAUTION!

• Never attempt to straddle a rock that is large enough

to strike your axles or undercarriage.

• Never attempt to drive over a rock which is large

enough to contact the door sills.

Crossing A Ravine, Gully, Ditch, Washout Or Rut

When crossing a ravine, gully, ditch, washout or a large rut,

the angled approach is the key to maintaining your vehi-

cle’s mobility. Approach these obstacles at a 45-degree

angle and let each tire go through the obstacle indepen-

dently. You need to use caution when crossing large

obstacles with steep sides. Do not attempt to cross any

large obstacle with steep sides at an angle great enough to

put the vehicle at risk of a rollover. If you get caught in a

rut, dig a small trench to the right or left at a 45-degree

angle ahead of the front tires. Use the removed dirt to fill

the rut ahead of the turnout you just created. You should

now be able to drive out following the trench you just

created at a 45-degree angle.

WARNING!

There is an increased risk of rollover when crossing an
obstacle, at any angle, with steep sides.

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

363

Crossing Logs

To cross a log, approach it at a slight angle (approximately

10 to 15 degrees). This allows one front tire to be on top of

the log while the other just starts to climb the log. While

climbing the log, modulate your brake and accelerator to

avoid spinning the log out from under your tires. Then

ease the vehicle off the log using your brakes.

CAUTION!

Do not attempt to cross a log with a greater diameter
than the running ground clearance or the vehicle will
become high-centered.

Getting High-Centered

If you get hung up or high-centered on an object, get out of

the vehicle and try to determine what the vehicle is hung

up on, where it is contacting the underbody and what is the

best direction to recover the vehicle. Depending on what

you are in contact with, jack the vehicle up and place a few

rocks under the tires so the weight is off of the high point

when you let the vehicle down. You can also try rocking the

vehicle or winching the vehicle off the object.

CAUTION!

Winching or rocking the vehicle off hard objects in-
creases the risk of underbody damage.

Hill Climbing

Hill climbing requires good judgment and a good under-

standing of your abilities and your vehicle’s limitations.

Hills can cause serious problems. Some are just too steep to

climb and should not be attempted. You should always feel

confident with the vehicle and your abilities. You should

always climb hills straight up and down. Never attempt to

climb a hill on an angle.

Before Climbing A Steep Hill

As you approach a hill, consider its grade or steepness.

Determine if it is too steep. Look to see what the traction is

on the hill side trail. Is the trail straight up and down?

What is on top and the other side? Are there ruts, rocks,

branches or other obstacles on the path? Can you safely

recover the vehicle if something goes wrong? If everything

looks good and you feel confident, shift the transmission

into a lower gear with 4L (Low) engaged, and proceed with

caution, maintaining your momentum as you climb the

hill.

364

STARTING AND OPERATING

Driving Up Hill

Once you have determined your ability to proceed and

have shifted into the appropriate gear, line your vehicle up

for the straightest possible run. Accelerate with an easy

constant throttle and apply more power as you start up the

hill. Do not race forward into a steep grade; the abrupt

change of grade could cause you to lose control. If the front

end begins to bounce, ease off the throttle slightly to bring

all four tires back on the ground. As you approach the crest

of the hill, ease off the throttle and slowly proceed over the

top. If the wheels start to slip as you approach the crest of

a hill, ease off the accelerator and maintain headway by

turning the steering wheel no more than a 1/4 turn quickly

back and forth. This will provide a fresh

⬙bite⬙ into the

surface and will usually provide enough traction to com-

plete the climb. If you do not make it to the top, place the

vehicle in REVERSE and back straight down the grade

using engine resistance along with the vehicle brakes.

WARNING!

Never attempt to climb a hill at an angle or turn around
on a steep grade. Driving across an incline increases
the risk of a rollover, which may result in severe injury.

Driving Downhill
Before driving down a steep hill, you need to determine if

it is too steep for a safe descent. What is the surface

traction? Is the grade too steep to maintain a slow, con-

trolled descent? Are there obstacles? Is it a straight descent?

Is there plenty of distance at the base of the hill to regain

control if the vehicle descends to fast? If you feel confident

in your ability to proceed, then make sure you are in 4L

(Low) and proceed with caution. Allow engine braking to

control the descent and apply your brakes, if necessary, but

do not allow the tires to lock.

WARNING!

Do not descend a steep grade in NEUTRAL. Use
vehicle brakes in conjunction with engine braking.
Descending a grade too fast could cause you to lose
control and be seriously injured or killed.

Driving Across An Incline
If at all possible, avoid driving across an incline. If it is

necessary, know your vehicle’s abilities. Driving across an

incline places more weight on the downhill wheels, which

increases the possibilities of a downhill slide or rollover.

Make sure the surface has good traction with firm and

stable soils. If possible, transverse the incline at an angle

heading slightly up or down.

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

365

WARNING!

Driving across an incline increases the risk of a roll-
over, which may result in severe injury.

If You Stall Or Begin To Lose Headway

If you stall or begin to lose headway while climbing a steep

hill, allow your vehicle to come to a stop and immediately

apply the brake. Restart the engine and shift into RE-

VERSE. Back slowly down the hill allowing engine braking

to control the descent and apply your brakes, if necessary,

but do not allow the tires to lock.

WARNING!

If the engine stalls or you lose headway or cannot
make it to the top of a steep hill or grade, never attempt
to turn around. To do so may result in tipping and
rolling the vehicle, which may result in severe injury.
Always back carefully straight down a hill in RE-
VERSE. Never back down a hill in NEUTRAL using
only the vehicle brakes. Never drive diagonally across
a hill, always drive straight up or down.

Driving Through Water

Extreme care should be taken crossing any type of water.

Water crossings should be avoided, if possible, and only be

attempted when necessary in a safe, responsible manner.

You should only drive through areas which are designated

and approved. You should tread lightly and avoid damage

to the environment. You should know your vehicle’s

abilities and be able to recover it if something goes wrong.

You should never stop or shut a vehicle off when crossing

deep water unless you ingested water into the engine air

intake. If the engine stalls, do not attempt to restart it.

Determine if it has ingested water first. The key to any

crossing is low and slow. Shift into first gear (manual

transmission), or DRIVE (automatic transmission), with the

transfer case in the 4L (Low) position and proceed very

slowly with a constant slow speed {3 to 5 mph (5 to 8

km/h) maximum} and light throttle. Keep the vehicle

moving; do not try to accelerate through the crossing. After

crossing any water higher than the bottom of the axle

differentials, you should inspect all of the vehicle fluids for

signs of water ingestion.

366

STARTING AND OPERATING

CAUTION!

• Water ingestion into the axles, transmission, transfer

case, engine or vehicle interior can occur if you drive
too fast or through too deep of water. Water can cause
permanent damage to engine, driveline or other
vehicle components, and your brakes will be less
effective once wet and/or muddy.

• When driving through water, do not exceed 5 mph

(8 km/h). Always check water depth before entering
as a precaution, and check all fluids afterward.
Driving through water may cause damage that may
not be covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.

Before You Cross Any Type Of Water

As you approach any type of water, you need to determine

if you can cross it safely and responsibly. If necessary, get

out and walk through the water or probe it with a stick.

You need to be sure of its depth, approach angle, current

and bottom condition. Be careful of murky or muddy

waters; check for hidden obstacles. Make sure you will not

be intruding on any wildlife, and you can recover the

vehicle if necessary. The key to a safe crossing is the water

depth, current and bottom conditions. On soft bottoms, the

vehicle will sink in, effectively increasing the water level on

the vehicle. Be sure to consider this when determining the

depth and the ability to safely cross.

Crossing Puddles, Pools, Flooded Areas Or Other
Standing Water

Puddles, pools, flooded or other standing water areas

normally contain murky or muddy waters. These water

types normally contain hidden obstacles and make it

difficult to determine an accurate water depth, approach

angle, and bottom condition. Murky or muddy water holes

are where you want to hook up tow straps prior to

entering. This makes for a faster, cleaner and easier vehicle

recovery. If you are able to determine you can safely cross,

than proceed using the low and slow method.

CAUTION!

Muddy waters can reduce the cooling system effective-
ness by depositing debris onto the radiator.

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

367

Crossing Ditches, Streams, Shallow Rivers Or Other
Flowing Water

Flowing water can be extremely dangerous. Never attempt

to cross a fast running stream or river even in shallow

water. Fast moving water can easily push your vehicle

downstream, sweeping it out of control. Even in very

shallow water, a high current can still wash the dirt out

from around your tires putting you and your vehicle in

jeopardy. There is still a high risk of personal injury and

vehicle damage with slower water currents in depths

greater than the vehicle’s running ground clearance. You

should never attempt to cross flowing water which is

deeper than the vehicle’s running ground clearance. Even

the slowest current can push the heaviest vehicle down-

stream and out of control if the water is deep enough to

push on the large surface area of the vehicle’s body. Before

you proceed, determine the speed of the current, the

water’s depth, approach angle, bottom condition and if

there are any obstacles. Then cross at an angle heading

slightly upstream using the low and slow technique.

WARNING!

Never drive through fast moving deep water. It can
push your vehicle downstream, sweeping it out of
control. This could put you and your passengers at risk
of injury or drowning.

After Driving Off-Road

Off-road operation puts more stress on your vehicle than

does most on-road driving. After going off-road, it is

always a good idea to check for damage. That way you can

get any problems taken care of right away and have your

vehicle ready when you need it.
• Completely inspect the underbody of your vehicle.

Check tires, body structure, steering, suspension, and

exhaust system for damage.

• Inspect the radiator for mud and debris and clean as

required.

368

STARTING AND OPERATING

• Check threaded fasteners for looseness, particularly on

the chassis, drivetrain components, steering, and sus-

pension. Retighten them, if required, and torque to the

values specified in the Service Manual.

• Check for accumulations of plants or brush. These things

could be a fire hazard. They might hide damage to fuel

lines, brake hoses, axle pinion seals, and propeller shafts.

• After extended operation in mud, sand, water, or similar

dirty conditions, have the radiator, fan, brake rotors,

wheels, brake linings, and axle yokes inspected and

cleaned as soon as possible.

NOTE:

Inspect the clutch vent holes in the manual trans-

mission bell housing for mud and debris and clean as

required.

WARNING!

Abrasive material in any part of the brakes may cause
excessive wear or unpredictable braking. You might
not have full braking power when you need it to
prevent a collision. If you have been operating your
vehicle in dirty conditions, get your brakes checked
and cleaned as necessary.

• If you experience unusual vibration after driving in

mud, slush or similar conditions, check the wheels for

impacted material. Impacted material can cause a wheel

imbalance and freeing the wheels of it will correct the

situation.

6

STARTING AND OPERATING

369

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

CONTENTS

䡵 HAZARD WARNING FLASHERS . . . . . . . . . . . .372
䡵 ASSIST AND SOS MIRROR — IF EQUIPPED . . . .372
䡵 BULB REPLACEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .378

▫ Replacement Bulbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .378
▫ Bulb Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .379

䡵 FUSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .383

▫ General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .383
▫ Power Distribution Center (PDC) . . . . . . . . . . .384

䡵 JACKING AND TIRE CHANGING . . . . . . . . . . .391

▫ Jack Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .392
▫ Spare Tire Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .394
▫ Preparations For Jacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .394
▫ Jacking Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .395
▫ Road Tire Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .398

䡵 MANUAL PARK RELEASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .399
䡵 JUMP STARTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .401

▫ Preparations For Jump Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .401
▫ Jump Starting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .402

䡵 IF YOUR ENGINE OVERHEATS . . . . . . . . . . . . .404
䡵 FREEING A STUCK VEHICLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .405
䡵 TOWING A DISABLED VEHICLE . . . . . . . . . . . .407

▫ Four–Wheel Drive Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .408
▫ Emergency Tow Hooks — If Equipped . . . . . . .408

䡵 ENHANCED ACCIDENT RESPONSE SYSTEM

(EARS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .409

䡵 EVENT DATA RECORDER (EDR) . . . . . . . . . . . .409

7

HAZARD WARNING FLASHERS

The Hazard Warning flasher switch is located on the

instrument panel below the climate controls.

Push the switch to turn on the Hazard Warning

flasher. When the switch is activated, all direc-

tional turn signals will flash on and off to warn

oncoming traffic of an emergency. Push the

switch a second time to turn off the Hazard Warning

flashers.
This is an emergency warning system and it should not be

used when the vehicle is in motion. Use it when your

vehicle is disabled and it is creating a safety hazard for

other motorists.
When you must leave the vehicle to seek assistance, the

Hazard Warning flashers will continue to operate even

though the ignition is placed in the OFF position.

NOTE:

With extended use the Hazard Warning flashers

may wear down your battery.

ASSIST AND SOS MIRROR — IF EQUIPPED

If equipped, the rearview mirror contains an ASSIST and a

SOS button.

Assist And SOS Mirror

372

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

WARNING!

ALWAYS obey traffic laws and pay attention to the
road. ALWAYS drive safely with your hands on the
steering wheel. You have full responsibility and as-
sume all risks related to the use of the features and
applications in this vehicle. Only use the features and
applications when it is safe to do so. Failure to do so
may result in an accident involving serious injury or
death.

NOTE:
• Your vehicle may be transmitting data as authorized by

the subscriber.

• The SOS and ASSIST buttons will only function if you

are connected to an operable LTE (voice/data) or 4G

(data) network. Other Uconnect services will only be

operable if your SiriusXM Guardian service is active and

you are connected to an operable LTE (voice/data) or 4G

(data) network.

ASSIST Call

The ASSIST Button is used to automatically connect you to

any one of the following support centers:
• Roadside Assistance – If you get a flat tire, or need a tow,

just push the ASSIST button and you’ll be connected to

someone who can help. Roadside Assistance will know

what vehicle you’re driving and its location. Additional

fees may apply for roadside assistance.

• SiriusXM Guardian Customer Care – In-vehicle support

for SiriusXM Guardian.

• Vehicle Customer Care – Total support for all other

vehicle issues.

SOS Call

1. Push the SOS Call button on the Rearview Mirror.

NOTE:

In case the SOS Call button is pushed in error, there

will be a ten second delay before the SOS Call system

initiates a call to a SOS operator. To cancel the SOS Call

connection, push the SOS call button on the Rearview

Mirror or press the cancellation button on the Device

Screen. Termination of the SOS Call will turn off the green

LED light on the Rearview Mirror.

7

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

373

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  21  22  23  24   ..