Jeep Wrangler (2018 year). Instruction - part 17

 

  Index      Jeep     Jeep Wrangler - instruction 2018 year in english

 

Search            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  15  16  17  18   ..

 

 

Jeep Wrangler (2018 year). Instruction - part 17

 

 

Event Data Recorder (EDR)

This vehicle is equipped with an event data recorder

(EDR). The main purpose of an EDR is to record, in certain

crash or near crash-like situations, such as an air bag

deployment or hitting a road obstacle, data that will assist

in understanding how a vehicle’s systems performed. The

EDR is designed to record data related to vehicle dynamics

and safety systems for a short period of time, typically 30

seconds or less. The EDR in this vehicle is designed to

record such data as:
• How various systems in your vehicle were operating;
• Whether or not the driver and passenger safety belts

were buckled/fastened;

• How far (if at all) the driver was depressing the accel-

erator and/or brake pedal; and,

• How fast the vehicle was traveling.
These data can help provide a better understanding of the

circumstances in which crashes and injuries occur.

NOTE:

EDR data are recorded by your vehicle only if a

non-trivial crash situation occurs; no data are recorded by

the EDR under normal driving conditions and no personal

data (e.g., name, gender, age, and crash location) are

recorded. However, other parties, such as law enforcement,

could combine the EDR data with the type of personally

identifying data routinely acquired during a crash investi-

gation.
To read data recorded by an EDR, special equipment is

required, and access to the vehicle or the EDR is needed. In

addition to the vehicle manufacturer, other parties, such as

law enforcement, that have the special equipment, can read

the information if they have access to the vehicle or the

EDR.

Child Restraints

Everyone in your vehicle needs to be buckled up at all

times, including babies and children. Every state in the

United States, and every Canadian province, requires that

small children ride in proper restraint systems. This is the

law, and you can be prosecuted for ignoring it.

262

SAFETY

Children 12 years or younger should ride properly buckled

up in a rear seat, if available. According to crash statistics,

children are safer when properly restrained in the rear

seats rather than in the front.

WARNING!

In a collision, an unrestrained child can become a
projectile inside the vehicle. The force required to hold
even an infant on your lap could become so great that
you could not hold the child, no matter how strong you
are. The child and others could be badly injured or
killed. Any child riding in your vehicle should be in a
proper restraint for the child’s size.

There are different sizes and types of restraints for children

from newborn size to the child almost large enough for an

adult safety belt. Always check the child seat Owner’s

Manual to make sure you have the correct seat for your

child. Carefully read and follow all the instructions and

warnings in the child restraint Owner’s Manual and on all

the labels attached to the child restraint.
Before buying any restraint system, make sure that it has a

label certifying that it meets all applicable Safety Stan-

dards. You should also make sure that you can install it in

the vehicle where you will use it.

NOTE:
• For additional information, refer to www.safercar.gov/

parents/index.htm or call: 1–888–327–4236

• Canadian residents should refer to Transport Canada’s

website

for

additional

information:

http://

www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehiclesafety/safedrivers-

childsafety-index-53.htm

5

SAFETY

263

Summary Of Recommendations For Restraining
Children In Vehicles

Child Size, Height, Weight Or Age

Recommended Type Of Child

Restraint

Infants and Toddlers

Children who are two years old or

younger and who have not reached

the height or weight limits of their

child restraint

Either an Infant Carrier or a Convert-

ible Child Restraint, facing rearward

in the rear seat of the vehicle

Small Children

Children who are at least two years

old or who have outgrown the

height or weight limit of their rear-

facing child restraint

Forward-Facing Child Restraint with

a five-point Harness, facing forward

in the rear seat of the vehicle

Larger Children

Children who have outgrown their

forward-facing child restraint, but

are too small to properly fit the vehi-

cle’s seat belt

Belt Positioning Booster Seat and the

vehicle seat belt, seated in the rear

seat of the vehicle

Children Too Large for Child Re-

straints

Children 12 years old or younger,

who have outgrown the height or

weight limit of their booster seat

Vehicle Seat Belt, seated in the rear

seat of the vehicle

264

SAFETY

Infant And Child Restraints

Safety experts recommend that children ride rear-facing in

the vehicle until they are two years old or until they reach

either the height or weight limit of their rear-facing child

restraint. Two types of child restraints can be used rear-

facing: infant carriers and convertible child seats.
The infant carrier is only used rear-facing in the vehicle. It

is recommended for children from birth until they reach

the weight or height limit of the infant carrier. Convertible

child seats can be used either rear-facing or forward-facing

in the vehicle. Convertible child seats often have a higher

weight limit in the rear-facing direction than infant carriers

do, so they can be used rear-facing by children who have

outgrown their infant carrier but are still less than at least

two years old. Children should remain rear-facing until

they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their

convertible child seat.

WARNING!

• Never place a rear-facing child restraint in front of an

air bag. A deploying passenger front air bag can
cause death or serious injury to a child 12 years or
younger, including a child in a rear-facing child
restraint.

• Only use a rear-facing child restraint in a vehicle

with a rear seat.

Older Children And Child Restraints

Children who are two years old or who have outgrown

their rear-facing convertible child seat can ride forward-

facing in the vehicle. Forward-facing child seats and con-

vertible child seats used in the forward-facing direction are

for children who are over two years old or who have

outgrown the rear-facing weight or height limit of their

rear-facing convertible child seat. Children should remain

in a forward-facing child seat with a harness for as long as

possible, up to the highest weight or height allowed by the

child seat.

5

SAFETY

265

All children whose weight or height is above the forward-

facing limit for the child seat should use a belt-positioning

booster seat until the vehicle’s seat belts fit properly. If the

child cannot sit with knees bent over the vehicle’s seat

cushion while the child’s back is against the seatback, they

should use a belt-positioning booster seat. The child and

belt-positioning booster seat are held in the vehicle by the

seat belt.

WARNING!

• Improper installation can lead to failure of an infant

or child restraint. It could come loose in a collision.
The child could be badly injured or killed. Follow
the child restraint manufacturer’s directions exactly
when installing an infant or child restraint.

• After a child restraint is installed in the vehicle, do

not move the vehicle seat forward or rearward be-
cause it can loosen the child restraint attachments.
Remove the child restraint before adjusting the ve-
hicle seat position. When the vehicle seat has been
adjusted, reinstall the child restraint.

(Continued)

WARNING! (Continued)

• When your child restraint is not in use, secure it in

the vehicle with the seat belt or LATCH anchorages,
or remove it from the vehicle. Do not leave it loose in
the vehicle. In a sudden stop or accident, it could
strike the occupants or seatbacks and cause serious
personal injury.

Children Too Large For Booster Seats

Children who are large enough to wear the shoulder belt

comfortably, and whose legs are long enough to bend over

the front of the seat when their back is against the seatback,

should use the seat belt in a rear seat. Use this simple 5-step

test to decide whether the child can use the vehicle’s seat

belt alone:
1. Can the child sit all the way back against the back of the

vehicle seat?

2. Do the child’s knees bend comfortably over the front of

the vehicle seat – while the child is still sitting all the

way back?

266

SAFETY

3. Does the shoulder belt cross the child’s shoulder be-

tween their neck and arm?

4. Is the lap part of the belt as low as possible, touching the

child’s thighs and not the stomach?

5. Can the child stay seated like this for the whole trip?
If the answer to any of these questions was “no,” then the

child still needs to use a booster seat in this vehicle. If the

child is using the lap/shoulder belt, check seat belt fit

periodically and make sure the seat belt buckle is latched.

A child’s squirming or slouching can move the belt out of

position. If the shoulder belt contacts the face or neck,

move the child closer to the center of the vehicle, or use a

booster seat to position the seat belt on the child correctly.

WARNING!

Never allow a child to put the shoulder belt under an
arm or behind their back. In a crash, the shoulder belt
will not protect a child properly, which may result in
serious injury or death. A child must always wear both
the lap and shoulder portions of the seat belt correctly.

5

SAFETY

267

Recommendations For Attaching Child Restraints

Restraint Type

Combined

Weight of the

Child + Child

Restraint

Use Any Attachment Method Shown With An “X” Below

LATCH – Lower

Anchors Only

Seat Belt Only

LATCH – Lower

Anchors + Top

Tether Anchor

Seat Belt + Top

Tether Anchor

Rear-Facing

Child Restraint

Up to 65 lbs

(29.5 kg)

X

X

Rear-Facing

Child Restraint

More than 65 lbs

(29.5 kg)

X

Forward-Facing

Child Restraint

Up to 65 lbs

(29.5 kg)

X

X

Forward-Facing

Child Restraint

More than 65 lbs

(29.5 kg)

X

268

SAFETY

Lower Anchors And Tethers For CHildren (LATCH)
Restraint System

Your vehicle is equipped with the child restraint anchorage

system called LATCH, which stands for Lower Anchors

and Tethers for CHildren. The LATCH system has three

vehicle anchor points for installing LATCH-equipped child

seats. There are two lower anchorages located at the back

of the seat cushion where it meets the seatback and one top

tether anchorage located behind the seating position. These

anchorages are used to install LATCH-equipped child seats

without using the vehicle’s seat belts. Some seating posi-

tions may have a top tether anchorage but no lower

anchorages. In these seating positions, the seat belt must be

used with the top tether anchorage to install the child

restraint. Please see the following table for more

information.

LATCH Label

5

SAFETY

269

LATCH Positions For Installing Child Restraints In
This Vehicle

LATCH Positions (Two-Door Models)

Lower Anchorage Symbol (2 Anchorages Per Seating Position)

Top Tether Anchorage Symbol

LATCH Positions (Four-Door Models)

Lower Anchorage Symbol (2 Anchorages Per Seating Position)

Top Tether Anchorage Symbol

270

SAFETY

Frequently Asked Questions About Installing Child Restraints With LATCH

What is the weight limit (child’s

weight + weight of the child re-

straint) for using the LATCH anchor-

age system to attach the child re-

straint?

65 lbs (29.5 kg)

Use the LATCH anchorage system

until the combined weight of the

child and the child restraint is 65 lbs

(29.5 kg). Use the seat belt and tether

anchor instead of the LATCH system

once the combined weight is more

than 65 lbs (29.5 kg).

Can the LATCH anchorages and the

seat belt be used together to attach a

rear-facing or forward-facing child

restraint?

No

Do not use the seat belt when you

use the LATCH anchorage system to

attach a rear-facing or forward-facing

child restraint.

Booster seats may be attached to the

LATCH anchorages if allowed by the

booster seat manufacturer. See your

booster seat owner’s manual for

more information.

Can a child seat be installed in the

center position using the inner

LATCH lower anchorages?

Two Door Models- No

Four Door Models - Yes

Four Door Only: You can install child

restraints with flexible lower anchors

in the center position. The inner an-

chorages are 18.5 inches (484 mm)

apart. Do not install child restraints

with rigid lower anchors in the cen-

ter position.

5

SAFETY

271

Frequently Asked Questions About Installing Child Restraints With LATCH

Can two child restraints be attached

using a common lower LATCH an-

chorage?

No

Never “share” a LATCH anchorage

with two or more child restraints. If

the center position does not have

dedicated LATCH lower anchorages,

use the seat belt to install a child seat

in the center position next to a child

seat using the LATCH anchorages in

an outboard position.

Can the rear-facing child restraint

touch the back of the front passenger

seat?

Yes

The child seat may touch the back of

the front passenger seat if the child

restraint manufacturer also allows

contact. See your child restraint own-

er’s manual for more information.

Can the head restraints be removed?

Two Door Models — No

Four Door Models — Yes

Two Door Models — None

Four Door Models — Center Only

NOTE:

If the folding, non-adjustable head restraint inter-

feres with the installation of the child restraint, the head

restraint may be folded and the child seat installed in front

of it (Two-Door Models).

WARNING!

Always make sure the head restraint is in its upright
position when the seat is to be used by an occupant
who is not in a child restraint. Sitting in a seat with the
head restraint in its lowered position could result in
serious injury or death in a collision.

272

SAFETY

Locating The LATCH Anchorages

The lower anchorages are round bars that are

found at the rear of the seat cushion where it

meets the seatback, below the anchorage sym-

bols on the seatback. They are just visible when

you lean into the rear seat to install the child restraint. You

will easily feel them if you run your finger along the gap

between the seatback and seat cushion.

Car Seat With Head Restraint Folded

1 — Folded Headrest
2 — Child Restraint

LATCH Anchorages (Two-Door Models)

5

SAFETY

273

Locating The Upper Tether Anchorages

Two-Door Models:

There are tether strap anchorages behind each

rear seating position located on the back of the

seat, near the floor.

Four-Door Models:

There are tether strap anchorages behind each rear seating

position located on the back of the seat.

LATCH Anchorages (Four-Door Models)

Tether Strap Anchorages (Two-Door Models)

274

SAFETY

LATCH-compatible child restraint systems will be

equipped with a rigid bar or a flexible strap on each side.

Each will have a hook or connector to attach to the lower

anchorage and a way to tighten the connection to the

anchorage. Forward-facing child restraints and some rear-

facing child restraints will also be equipped with a tether

strap. The tether strap will have a hook at the end to attach

to the top tether anchorage and a way to tighten the strap

after it is attached to the anchorage.

Center Seat LATCH

Two-Door Models:

WARNING!

This vehicle does not have a center seating position.
Do not use the center lower LATCH anchorages to
install a child seat in the center of the back seat.

Four-Door Models:

Do not install child restraints with rigid lower attachments

in the center seating position. Only install this type of child

restraint in the outboard seating positions. Child restraints

with flexible, webbing mounted lower attachments can be

installed in any rear seating position.

WARNING!

Never use the same lower anchorage to attach more
than one child restraint. If you are installing LATCH-
compatible child restraints next to each other, you must
use the seat belt for the center position. You can then
use either the LATCH anchors or the vehicle’s seat belt
for installing child seats in the outboard positions.

(Continued)

Tether Strap Anchorages (Four-Door Models)

5

SAFETY

275

WARNING! (Continued)

Please refer to “Installing The LATCH-Compatible
Child Restraint System” for typical installation in-
structions.

Always follow the directions of the child restraint manu-
facturer when installing your child restraint. Not all child
restraint systems will be installed as described here.

To Install A LATCH-Compatible Child Restraint

If the selected seating position has a Switchable Automatic

Locking Retractor (ALR) seat belt, stow the seat belt,

following the instructions below. See the section “Installing

Child Restraints Using the Vehicle Seat Belt” to check what

type of seat belt each seating position has.
1. Loosen the adjusters on the lower straps and on the

tether strap of the child seat so that you can more easily

attach the hooks or connectors to the vehicle anchor-

ages.

2. Place the child seat between the lower anchorages for

that seating position. For some second row seats, you

may need to recline the seat and / or raise the head

restraint to get a better fit. If the rear seat can be moved

forward and rearward in the vehicle, you may wish to

move it to its rear-most position to make room for the

child seat. You may also move the front seat forward to

allow more room for the child seat.

3. Attach the lower hooks or connectors of the child

restraint to the lower anchorages in the selected seating

position.

4. If the child restraint has a tether strap, connect it to the

top tether anchorage. See the section “Installing Child

Restraints Using the Top Tether Anchorage” for direc-

tions to attach a tether anchor.

5. Tighten all of the straps as you push the child restraint

rearward and downward into the seat. Remove slack in

the straps according to the child restraint manufactur-

er’s instructions.

6. Test that the child restraint is installed tightly by pulling

back and forth on the child seat at the belt path. It

should not move more than 1 inch (25.4 mm) in any

direction.

How To Stow An Unused Switchable-ALR (ALR)
Seat Belt:

When using the LATCH attaching system to install a child

restraint, stow all ALR seat belts that are not being used by

other occupants or being used to secure child restraints. An

276

SAFETY

unused belt could injure a child if they play with it and

accidentally lock the seat belt retractor. Before installing a

child restraint using the LATCH system, buckle the seat

belt behind the child restraint and out of the child’s reach.

If the buckled seat belt interferes with the child restraint

installation, instead of buckling it behind the child re-

straint, route the seat belt through the child restraint belt

path and then buckle it. Do not lock the seat belt. Remind

all children in the vehicle that the seat belts are not toys and

that they should not play with them.

WARNING!

• Improper installation of a child restraint to the

LATCH anchorages can lead to failure of the re-
straint. The child could be badly injured or killed.
Follow the child restraint manufacturer’s directions
exactly when installing an infant or child restraint.

• Child restraint anchorages are designed to withstand

only those loads imposed by correctly-fitted child
restraints. Under no circumstances are they to be
used for adult seat belts, harnesses, or for attaching
other items or equipment to the vehicle.

Installing Child Restraints Using The Vehicle Seat
Belt

Child restraint systems are designed to be secured in

vehicle seats by lap belts or the lap belt portion of a

lap/shoulder belt.

WARNING!

• Improper installation or failure to properly secure a

child restraint can lead to failure of the restraint. The
child could be badly injured or killed.

• Follow the child restraint manufacturer’s directions

exactly when installing an infant or child restraint.

The seat belts in the passenger seating positions are

equipped with a Switchable Automatic Locking Retractor

(ALR) that is designed to keep the lap portion of the seat

belt tight around the child restraint so that it is not

necessary to use a locking clip. The ALR retractor can be

“switched” into a locked mode by pulling all of the

webbing out of the retractor and then letting the webbing

retract back into the retractor. If it is locked, the ALR will

make a clicking noise while the webbing is pulled back into

the retractor. Refer to the “Automatic Locking Mode”

5

SAFETY

277

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  15  16  17  18   ..