Honda Civic Si Coupe (2004 year). Instruction - part 3

 

  Index      Honda     Honda Civic Si Coupe - instruction 2004 year in english

 

Search            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  1  2  3  4   ..

 

 

Honda Civic Si Coupe (2004 year). Instruction - part 3

 

 

If they do, they

could be very seriously injured in a
crash.

During a crash, the

belt could press deep into the child
and cause serious or fatal injuries.

Children who play in vehicles can
accidentally get trapped inside.
Teach your children not to play in
or around vehicles.

Even very young

children learn how to unlock
vehicle doors, turn on the ignition
switch, and open the hatch, which
can lead to accidental injury or
death.

If you are not wearing a

seat belt in a crash, you could be
thrown forward and crush the
child against the dashboard or a
seat-back. If you are wearing a
seat belt the child can be torn
from your arms and be seriously
hurt or killed.

Leaving children without

adult supervision is illegal in most
states and Canadian provinces,
and can be very hazardous.
For example, infants and small
children left in a vehicle on a hot
day can die from heatstroke. A
child left alone with the key in the
ignition can accidentally set the
vehicle in motion, possibly injuring
themselves or others.

Additional Saf ety Precautions

Never let two children use the
same seat belt.

Never put a seat belt over yourself
and a child.

Lock both doors and the hatch
when your vehicle is not in use.

Keep vehicle keys and remote
transmitters out of reach of
children.

Never hold an inf ant or child on
your lap.

Do not leave children alone in a
vehicle.

Protecting Children

General Guidelines

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

33

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Two types of seats may be used: a
seat designed exclusively for infants,
or a convertible seat used in the rear-
facing, reclining mode.

If placed

facing forward, an infant could be
very seriously injured during a
frontal collision.

Only a rear-facing child seat provides
proper support for a baby’s head,
neck, and back.

An infant must be properly
restrained in a rear-facing, reclining
child seat until the child reaches the
seat maker’s weight or height limit
for the seat and the child is at least
one year old.

A rear-facing child seat can be placed
in any seating position in the back
seat, but not in the front.

If the passenger’s front airbag
inflates, it can hit the back of the
child seat with enough force to kill or
seriously injure an infant.

When properly installed, a rear-
facing child seat may prevent the
driver or a front passenger from
moving the seat as far back as
recommended, or from locking the
seat-back in the desired position.

In either situation, we strongly
recommend that you install the child
seat directly behind the front
passenger seat, move the seat as far
forward as needed, and leave it
unoccupied. Or you may wish to get
a smaller rear-facing child seat.

Child Seat Placement

Do not put a rear-f acing child seat in
a f orward-f acing position.

Never put a

rear-f acing child seat in the f ront
seat.

Child Seat Type

Protecting Inf ants

Protecting Infants and Small Children

34

Placing a rear-facing child seat
in the front seat can result in
serious injury or death if the
passenger’s front airbag inflates.

Always place a rear-facing child
seat in the back seat, not the
front.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

If it is necessary to put a forward-
facing child seat in the front, move
the vehicle seat as far to the rear as
possible, be sure the child seat is
firmly secured to the vehicle, and the
child is properly strapped in the seat.

Of the different seats available, we
recommend those that have a five-
point harness system as shown.

A child who is at least one year old,
and who fits within the child seat
maker’s weight and height limits,
should be restrained in a forward-
facing, upright child seat.

We strongly recommend placing a
forward-facing child seat in a back
seat, not the front.

If the vehicle seat is too

far forward, or the child’s head is
thrown forward during a collision, an
inflating airbag can strike the child
with enough force to cause very
serious or fatal injuries.

Protecting Small Children

Protecting Infants and Small Children

Child Seat Type

Child Seat Placement

Placing a f orward-f acing child seat in
the f ront seat of a vehicle equipped
with a passenger’s airbag can be
hazardous.

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

35

Placing a forward-facing child
seat in the front seat can result
in serious injury or death if the
front airbag inflates.

If you must place a forward-
facing child seat in front, move
the vehicle seat as far back as
possible, and properly restrain
the child.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Whatever type of seat you choose, to
provide proper protection, a child
seat should meet three
requirements:

Look for FMVSS

213 or CMVSS 213 on the box.

Rear-facing for infants, forward-
facing for small children.

Before purchasing a conventional
child seat, or using a previously
purchased one, we recommend that
you test the seat in the specific
vehicle seating position, or positions,
where the seat will be used.

In seating positions and vehicles not
equipped with LATCH, a LATCH-
compatible child seat can be installed
using a seat belt.

When buying a child seat, you need
to choose either a conventional child
seat, or one designed for use with
the Lower Anchors and Tethers for
Children (LATCH) system.

Conventional child seats must be
secured to a vehicle with a seat belt,
whereas LATCH-compatible seats
are secured by attaching the seat to
hardware built into the two outer
second row seats.

Since LATCH-compatible child seats
are easier to install and reduce the
possibility of improper installation,
we recommend selecting this style.

We also recommend selecting a
LATCH-compatible seat with a rigid,
rather than a flexible, anchor (see
page

).

38

The child seat should meet U.S. or
Canadian Motor Vehicle Saf ety
Standard 213.

The child seat should be of the
proper type and size to f it the child.

The child seat should f it the
vehicle seating position (or
positions) where it will be used.

1.

2.

3.

Selecting a Child Seat

Selecting a Child Seat

36

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

A child seat secured with a seat belt
should be installed as firmly as
possible. However, it does not need
to be ‘‘rock solid.’’ Some side-to-side
movement can be expected and
should not reduce the child seat’s
effectiveness.

If the child seat is not secure, try
installing it in a different seating
position, or use a different style of
child seat that can be firmly secured.

The following pages provide
guidelines on how to properly install
a child seat. A forward-facing child
seat is used in all examples, but the
instructions are the same for a rear-
facing child seat.

Make sure the child is properly
strapped in the child seat
according to the child seat maker’s
instructions. A child who is not
properly secured in a child seat
can be thrown out of the seat in a
crash.

After selecting a proper child seat,
and a good place to install the seat,
there are three main steps in
installing the seat:

All child seats must be

secured to the vehicle with the lap
part of a lap/shoulder belt or with
the LATCH (Lower Anchors and
Tethers for Children) system. A
child whose seat is not properly
secured to the vehicle can be
endangered in a crash.

After installing a child

seat, push and pull the seat
forward and from side to side to
verify that it is secure.

Installing a Child Seat

Secure the child in the child seat.

Properly secure the child seat to
the vehicle.

Make sure the child seat is f irmly
secured.

1.

2.

3.

Installing a Child Seat

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

37

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Your vehicle is equipped with
LATCH (Lower Anchors and
Tethers for Children) at the outer
rear seats. The lower anchors are
located between the seat-back and
seat bottom, and are to be used only
with a child seat designed for use
with LATCH.

To install a LATCH-compatible child
seat:

Move the seat belt buckle or
tongue away from the lower
anchors.

Make sure there are no objects
near the anchors that could
prevent a secure connection
between the child seat and the
anchors.

Place the child seat on the vehicle
seat, then attach the seat to the
lower anchors according to the
child seat maker’s instructions.

Some LATCH-compatible seats
have a rigid-type connector as
shown above.

The location of each lower anchor is
indicated by a small button above the
anchor point.

1.

2.

3.

Installing a Child Seat

Installing a Child Seat Using
LATCH

38

LOWER ANCHORS

Rigid type

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Whatever type you have, follow
the child seat maker’s instructions
for adjusting or tightening the fit.

Lift the rear head restraint (see
page

), then route the tether

strap over the seat-back between
the legs of the head restraint,
making sure the strap is not
twisted.

Attach the tether strap hook to the
tether anchor, then tighten the
strap as instructed by the child
seat maker.

Push and pull the child seat
forward and from side to side to
verify that it is secure.

Other LATCH-compatible seats have
a flexible-type connector as shown
above.

6.

5.

4.

7.

72

Installing a Child Seat

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

39

Flexible type

TETHER STRAP HOOK

ANCHOR

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

When not using the LATCH system,
all child seats must be secured to the
vehicle with the lap part of a lap/
shoulder belt.

With the child seat in the desired
seating position, route the belt
through the child seat according
to the seat maker’s instructions,
then insert the latch plate into the
buckle.

In addition, the lap/shoulder belts in
all seating positions except the
driver’s have a locking mechanism
that must be activated to secure a
child seat.

1.

Installing a Child Seat

Installing a Child Seat with a Lap/
Shoulder Belt

40

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

To activate the lockable retractor,
slowly pull the shoulder part of the
belt all the way out until it stops,
then let the belt feed back into the
retractor.

After the belt has retracted, tug on
it. If the belt is locked, you will not
be able to pull it out. If you can pull
the belt out, it is not locked, and
you will need to repeat these steps.

After confirming that the belt is
locked, grab the shoulder part of
the belt near the buckle and pull
up to remove any slack from the
lap part of the belt. Remember, if
the lap part of the belt is not tight,
the child seat will not be secure.

To remove slack, it may help to
put weight on the child seat, or
push on the back of the seat while
pulling up on the belt.

Push and pull the child seat
forward and from side to side to
verify that it is secure enough to
stay upright during normal driving
maneuvers. If the child seat is not
secure, unlatch the belt, allow it to
retract fully, then repeat these
steps to deactivate the locking
mechanism and remove a child
seat, unlatch the buckle, unroute
the seat belt, and let the belt fully
retract.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Installing a Child Seat

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

41

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

One tether anchor point for each of
the outer rear seats is located under
the cargo floor carpet and the
tailgate sill. Pull up the carpet to
access the anchor point (outboard
anchor) when securing a tether-style
child seat to the vehicle.

Since a tether can provide additional
security to the lap/shoulder belt
installation, we recommend using a
tether whenever one is required or
available.

After properly securing the child
seat (see page

), lift the head

restraint, then route the tether
strap over the seat-back and
through the head restraint legs.
Lift the anchor point lid, then
attach the tether strap hook to the
anchor, making sure the strap is
not twisted.
Tighten the strap according to the
seat maker’s instructions.

2.

3.

1.

37

Installing a Child Seat

Installing a Child Seat with a
Tether

Using an Outer Anchor

42

TETHER STRAP HOOK

TETHER ANCHOR
POINTS

ANCHOR

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

When a child reaches the
recommended weight or height limit
for a forward-facing child seat, the
child should sit in a back seat on a
booster seat and wear a lap/shoulder
belt.

After properly securing the child
seat (see page

), route the

tether strap over the top of the
seat-back.

Follow instructions 2 and 3 in the
right column of the

previous

page.

The following pages give
instructions on how to check proper
seat belt fit, what kind of booster
seat to use if one is needed, and
important precautions for a child
who must sit in front.

1.

2.

40

Installing a Child Seat, Protecting Larger Children

Protecting Larger Children

Using the Center Anchor

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

43

ANCHOR
POINT

Allowing a larger child age 12 or
under to sit in front can result in
injury or death if the passenger’s
front airbag inflates.

If a larger child must ride in front,
move the vehicle seat as far
back as possible, use a booster
seat if needed, have the child
sit up properly and wear the
seat belt properly.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

To determine if a lap/shoulder belt
properly fits a child, have the child
put on the seat belt, then ask
yourself:

Does the child sit all the way back
against the seat?

Do the child’s knees bend
comfortably over the edge of the
seat?

Does the shoulder belt cross
between the child’s neck and arm?

Is the lap part of the belt as low as
possible, touching the child’s
thighs?

Will the child be able to stay
seated like this for the whole trip?

If you answer yes to all these
questions, the child is ready to wear
the lap/shoulder belt correctly. If
you answer no to any question, the
child needs to ride on a booster seat.

A child who has outgrown a forward-
facing child seat should ride in a
back seat and use a booster seat
until the lap/shoulder belt fits them
properly without the booster.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Checking Seat Belt Fit

Using a Booster Seat

Protecting Larger Children

44

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Some states also require children to
use a booster seat until they reach a
given age or weight (e.g., 6 years or
60 lbs). Be sure to check current
laws in the state or states where you
intend to drive.

A child may continue using a booster
seat until the tops of their ears are
even with the top of the vehicle’s or
booster’s seat-back. A child of this
height should be tall enough to use
the lap/shoulder belt without a
booster seat.

Booster seats can be high-back or
low-back. Whichever style you select,
make sure the booster meets federal
safety standards (see page

) and

that you follow the booster seat
maker’s instructions.

If a child who uses a booster seat
must ride in front, move the vehicle
seat as far to the rear as possible,
and be sure the child is wearing the
seat belt properly.

The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration and Transport
Canada recommend that all children
age 12 and under be properly
restrained in the back seat.

If the passenger’s front airbag
inflates in a moderate to severe
frontal collision, the airbag can cause
serious injuries to a child who is
unrestrained, improperly restrained,
sitting too close to the airbag, or out
of position.

The side airbag also poses risks. If
any part of a larger child’s body is in
the path of a deploying side airbag,
the child could receive possibly
serious injuries.

36

Protecting Larger Children

When Can a Larger Child Sit in
Front

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

45

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

If you decide that a child can safely
ride up front, be sure to:

Carefully read the owner’s manual,
and make sure you understand all
seat belt instructions and all safety
information.

Move the vehicle seat to the rear-
most position.

Have the child sit up straight, back
against the seat, and feet on or
near the floor.

This could result in

serious neck injuries during a crash.

This could cause

very serious injuries during a crash.
It also increases the chance that the
child will slide under the belt in a
crash and be injured.

If they do, they could

be very seriously injured in a crash.

Devices intended to improve a

child’s comfort or reposition the
shoulder part of a seat belt can make
the belt less effective and increase
the chance of serious injury in a
crash.

Of course, children vary widely. And
while age may be one indicator of
when a child can safely ride in the
front, there are other important
factors you should consider.

To safely ride in front, a child must
be able to follow the rules, including
sitting properly, and wearing the seat
belt properly throughout a ride.

Physically, a child must be large
enough for the lap/shoulder belt to
properly fit (see page

). If the seat

belt does not fit properly, with or
without the child sitting on a booster,
the child should not sit in the front.

Supervise the child. Even mature
children sometimes need to be
reminded to fasten the seat belts
or sit properly.

Check that the child’s seat belt is
properly and securely positioned.

44

Additional Saf ety Precautions

Do not let a child wear a seat belt
across the neck.

Do not let a child put the shoulder
part of a seat belt behind the back or
under the arm.

Two children should never use the
same seat belt.

Do not put any accessories on a seat
belt.

Maturity

Physical Size

Protecting Larger Children

46

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Your vehicle’s exhaust contains
carbon monoxide gas. You should
have no problem with carbon
monoxide entering the vehicle in
normal driving if you maintain your
vehicle properly.

Have the exhaust system inspected
for leaks whenever:

High levels of carbon monoxide can
collect rapidly in enclosed areas,
such as a garage. Do not run the
engine with the garage door closed.
Even with the door open, run the
engine only long enough to move the
vehicle out of the garage.

If you must sit in your parked vehicle
with the engine running, even in an
unconfined area, adjust the heating
and cooling system as follows:

Select the Fresh Air mode.
Select the

mode.

Turn the fan on high speed.
Set the temperature control to a
comfortable setting.

The vehicle is raised for an oil
change.

You notice a change in the sound
of the exhaust.

The vehicle was in an accident
that may have damaged the
underside.

With the hatch open, airflow can pull
exhaust gas into your vehicle’s
interior and create a hazardous
condition. If you must drive with the
hatch open, open all the windows
and set the heating and cooling
system as shown below.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Carbon Monoxide Hazard

Dr
iv

er
and

P

asseng

er
Saf

e

ty

47

Carbon monoxide gas is toxic.
Breathing it can cause
unconsciousness and even kill
you.

Avoid any enclosed areas or
activities that expose you to
carbon monoxide.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

These labels are in the locations
shown. They warn you of potential
hazards that could cause serious
injury. Read these labels carefully. If
a label comes off or becomes hard to
read, contact your dealer for a
replacement.

U.S. model only

U.S. model

Canadian model

On models without Side Airbags

On models with Side Airbags

Safety Labels

48

HOOD

SUN VISOR

RADIATOR CAP

DASHBOARD

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..  1  2  3  4   ..